Admin
Menu
NASHOBA TECH OPENS ADVANCED PROGRAM TO TRAIN SKILLED WORKERS OF FUTURE
NASHOBA TECH OPENS ADVANCED PROGRAM TO TRAIN SKILLED WORKERS OF FUTURE
Posted on 09/07/2016
 NASHOBA TECH OPENS ADVANCED PROGRAM TO TRAIN SKILLED WORKERS OF FUTUREAdv Manuf 1
Ryan Doiron, left, of Littleton and Emmitt Boyd of Ayer in front of one of the new machines in Nashoba Tech’s Advanced Manufacturing program. Ryan graduated from the former Machine Tool Technology program and plans to return this year as a postgraduate in Advanced Manufacturing, and Emmitt is in his senior year.

adv manuur 2
From left, state Rep. James Arciero and state Sen. Eileen Donoghue watch as state Rep. Sheila Harrington reads a proclamation from the House of Representatives and Senate to Nashoba Tech Superintendent Denise Pigeon.

Adv Manuf 3
Nashoba Tech Advanced Manufacturing staff, students and administrators, as well as state and district officials, await the official ribbon cutting to open the Advanced Manufacturing program. Holding the scissors are School Committee Chairman Al Buckley of Pepperell and Superintendent Denise Pigeon.

WESTFORD — In an effort to help close an ever-widening skills gap in Massachusetts, Nashoba Tech unveiled its brand-new Advanced Manufacturing program, the goal of which is to train students and adults for the hundreds of thousands of manufacturing jobs expected to open in the next decade in Massachusetts.

        About 75 people, including school employees, School Committee members, district and state officials, and representatives of local industry attended a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony to showcase the new program.

        The Advanced Manufacturing program is a revamping and updating of Nashoba Tech’s former Machine Tool Technology program.

        Thanks to a $500,000 grant from the Massachusetts Workforce Skills 
Capital Grant Program earlier this year, Nashoba Tech was able to buy all-new equipment and machines and renovate the classroom. The grant was part of $9.3 million the state gave to 35 schools or training providers. It was the largest competitive grant Nashoba Tech has ever received.

        Addressing the crowd at the reopening ceremony, Nashoba Tech 
Superintendent Denise Pigeon said the goals of the grant program “are focused on the strong understanding that the economic future of the commonwealth is heavily connected to workforce-skills education to assist residents in connecting with promising careers.”

        “A common theme we have heard from our constituents is the lack of availability in skilled workers in advanced manufacturing and of the desperate need of workers who can operate CNC machines, work with G code and perform any task in the machine-shop environment,” Pigeon said. “This knowledge of need, coupled with labor-market predictions and trends, made it abundantly clear that Nashoba Tech needed to focus
our attention on advanced manufacturing.”

        According to state Rep. James Arciero, a Westford Democrat who spoke 
at the ceremony, within the next 10 years, 100,000 manufacturing jobs will be open in Massachusetts, “not because there are not enough people interested but that they don’t have the necessary education and skills, and this program will make sure students have the skills to fill these positions.”

        Arciero, fellow state Rep. Sheila Harrington and state Sen. Eileen Donoghue all praised Gov. Charlie Baker and Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito for recognizing the need to prepare students to enter a burgeoning workforce by providing workforce-skills grants.

        “Massachusetts faces a shortage of workers,” said Donoghue, a Lowell Democrat, adding that programs like Nashoba Tech’s Advanced Manufacturing are “critically important to the future of the commonwealth.

        “This grant will allow Nashoba to better prepare students for the 21st century workforce and help close the skills gap,” she added.

        Harrington, a Groton Republican, presented Pigeon with a proclamation from the state House of Representatives and Senate. In her remarks, Harrington said that at recent Nashoba Valley Chamber of Commerce job fairs she has attended, “what has come through to us clear as a bell is that we don’t have enough people to fill these jobs.”

        She added, “We’ll have to ship out these jobs if we can’t train the 
people to do them.”

        Before cutting the ribbon with School Committee Chairman Al Buckley of Pepperell, Pigeon noted that “our work is far from complete,” adding that Nashoba Tech is already working on building partnerships with local businesses and community colleges to expand its offerings in continuing education to adults, “including veterans, chronically unemployed, economically disadvantaged and vocational-rehabilitation referrals to assist in providing all residents an opportunity to seek gainful employment.”

        After the ribbon was cut, those in attendance were able to get a look 
at the new, state-of-the-art equipment, which includes:

• A Haas VF-2 CNC machine.

• Two Haas VF-1 milling machines.
• A Haas TL-1 turning machine
• Three Bridgeport manual milling machines
• Three lathes
• Three TRAK EMX CNC milling machines
• A TRAK DPMsx3 CNC milling machine
• Three sharp surface grinders.